2013 Subaru Impreza WRX – STI – Ruge’s Subaru

28 Jul
  • Strong flat-four engines
  • Roomy interior
  • Ride quality
BOTTOM LINE
The 2013 Subaru Impreza WRX and STI are fun to drive, tractable in a wide range of conditions, and surprisingly comfortable and versatile; but the lack of an automatic transmission and poor fuel economy are factors that might limit their appeal.
111 viewsJuly 26, 2012

 

If you want a small, high-performance car that’s practical enough for family duty, and also drivable, even in snowy-weather states, all four seasons, the 2013 Subaru Impreza WRX family (including the STI edition) should be right up near the top of the list.

With strong turbocharged flat-four engines, roomy interiors, a comfortable ride, and a good reputation for safety, these models continue to offer both strong performance and are an impressive value for the money.

The WRX and STI models both carry over to 2013 in sedan and hatchback body styles with no significant styling changes versus last year. 2011 had been a big model year for these models; that’s when the WRX got the wide-fender look that had been previously reserved for the top-performance STI. The WRX and STI remain divorced from the more pedestrian Impreza, which got a long list of changes last year that made those models more unanimously good-looking–albeit in a more mass-market kind of way. The down side of this separation is that the WRX and STI are left with interior trims and switchgear that now feel slightly behind-the-times.

Simply put, the Subaru WRX is quick, while the STI is even quicker. But there are plenty of other differences in the STI that make it a worthy upgrade for focused enthusiasts. Both models share the same 2.5-liter engine displacement, with the WRX making 265 hp and the STI getting a 305-hp version (and a six-speed manual versus a five-speed). But the STI’s sharper tuning and Driver Controlled Center Differential (DCCD) extracts the most from the powertrain and the chassis. Between sedans and hatchbacks, all else the same, performance is equally rewarding. There’s one potential issue for some shoppers, though: No automatic transmissions are available. To many driving enthusiasts, that’s how it should be.

The two engines are only 40 hp apart, but they’re tuned quite differently. The WRX is more tractable in all-round usage, while the STI is harder to drive smooth; it needs to be revved and driven hard to extract its potential.

The racing-style bucket seats hold the driver and front passenger firmly in place, but the fixed headrests in the STI project forward at an uncomfortable angle.The STI models get fancier black Alcantara trim and upholstery with red stitching, front and rear, though the rear seats remain the standard-issue item from the regular Impreza. In either of these models, rear-seat space is remarkable for a compact car, with oceans of headroom even for those with tall torsos. Cargo space is respectable, but a rear seatback that won’t fold completely flat and a trunk (in the sedan) with a floor that’s not flat are sore points.

Considering they’re performance models–with crisp handling response–both the WRX and STI handle bumps, potholes, and coarse surfaces with aplomb. We’ve noted some engine rumble and wind noise from the side mirrors, but otherwise it’s very quiet in the cabin. The STI’s considerably louder (lower and pulsating) exhaust note isn’t obtrusive while cruising, though you’ll notice it when accelerating.

The 2013 Subaru WRX and STI models are offered in sedan and hatchback styles, and feature content is almost (but not quite) the same between body styles. The WRX comes in base, Premium, and Limited models, with navigation available at extra cost on Premium and Limited models. STI models come in base and Limited models, with navigation available on both. The STI hatchback is an exception; it’s offered in a single trim. Top Limited models include a moonroof, fog lamps, heated power mirrors, a windshield-wiper de-icer, and heated leather seats.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: